Music and Art In Your Backyard

Dead Music Capital Band

If you have been in Austin long enough, you will have encountered the brass organ band called Dead Music Capital Band, who keep the party going long after all festivals had their fill. The macabre musical party they engineer is the very essence of Austin weirdness; and their music, an unadulterated homage to New Orleans.

 
Image from Youtube

Image from Youtube

Where did the idea of for a undead-horror-style music band come from? And why? You also have so many members, tell us about the band.

Our undead menagerie had been playing for centuries, traveling with a circus from beyond the mortal veil.  When that circus pulled up stakes and moved on after their last visit to Austin (2011), we were accidentally left behind.  Rather than fade away into myth or legend, we decided to reinvent ourselves in honor of our newly adopted hometown.  We christened ourselves the Dead Music Capital Band, added some of your modern musical styles to our repertoire and have been on the haunt for good times and new fans ever since.

We are a fairly large band...membership expands and contracts pending member's abilities to self-manifest for gigs (it take considerable effort to assume enough physical mass and power to haul ourselves out of the mausoleum and into the hearse, not to mention the psychic energy needed to actually play shows).  That said, we have a small brass army in our ranks: five sousaphone players, a trombone-iphonium section of five, a trump-ophone section of six, a quartet of woodwinds, and a drum battery of six.

Fall 2011 was the official debut of the Dead Music Capital Band in this recognizable form.

How would you characterize your your sound for people who don’t know you?

Some call us "the swingin' sound from 6 feet down"...others call us "the (f)undead".  First and foremost, we are a really big brass band.  We love making humans dance, so most everything we do is intended to get blood pumping and people moving.  Our low brass section is huge--we have a big bottom end and love mashing up New Orleans brass rhythms with our old world, minor key tendencies.

With so many band members how do you keep everything organized and on track and how do you go about creating new music?

You'd be surprised how compatible Ouija boards are with Google Calendars.  New music comes as the spirit moves us...we have a number of members who have composed originals for the band or will arrange songs we suspect humans would enjoy hearing.

Image from Google

Image from Google

What’s an interesting fact about the band or the band’s member that people would be surprised to know.

Popular Misconception: We are not a zombie band!  We don't discriminate and are open to all types of otherworldly or undead musicians.  

You guys also have fantastic costumes and make-up. How long does it take to get ready for a show with make-up and so on?

Thanks for noticing!  We work really hard to blend in with the living--it can take anywhere from a few minutes up to a few hours to remove our human disguises before shows.

Do you sell your music? where can buy it?

Yes we do--the best way to pick up a CD is in person at our shows but we do sell via our website (www.dmcband.org).  We are also available via Spotify, iTunes, and Amazon.

Image from Google

Image from Google

What has been your favorite gig or festival performance to date and why?

There have been so many, it's hard to choose just one...but one of my personal favorites:

One that gets my musty, crusty heart beating the strongest is from the end of our first set at the 2016 HONK! Festival in Somerville, MA.  Members of the Original Big Seven Social Aid and Pleasure Society of New Orleans joined us for our final song--as always, they were dressed to the nines (sharp suits and hats, polished shoes, amazing sashes with the OB7 name, etc) and brought out their feathered fans and fanciest moves.  They sang and danced with us and the crowd while hyping everyone into a frenzy.  When we finished, one of the Big Seven leaned in and told me, "You all sound like home...sounds like New Orleans".  I couldn't thank him enough.  It was an honor to perform with them and I honestly cannot imagine a more treasured compliment.